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   Table of Contents - Current issue
Coverpage
January-June 2020
Volume 4 | Issue 1
Page Nos. 1-26

Online since Saturday, March 19, 2022

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REVIEW ARTICLES  

Stem cells in the oral cavity – An overview p. 1
Suganya Panneer Selvam, Sandhya Sundar, Lakshmi Trivandrum Anandapadmanabhan
DOI:10.4103/ijofb.ijofb_3_22  
Stem cells play a vital role in regenerative medicine and it has the capacity to form any type of tissue under favored circumstances. The stem cells from the oral cavity can be easily removed and used for the regeneration of both hard and soft tissues. This article aimed to review the sources of stem cells from the oral cavity and the application of the same in the orofacial region and the principles of stem cell bank for the betterment of the quality and quantity of stem cells.
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Connective tissue stains - A review p. 4
E Abigail Viola, B Hindia
DOI:10.4103/ijofb.ijofb_4_22  
Over the years, a wide range of dyes has been used for histological staining methods. Most of these have been adapted from those used in the textile dyeing industry. The common histological stains appeared during the second half of the 19th century. Routinely, hematoxylin and eosin stain is widely used for histopathological examination of tissue sections. Although they have plethora of advantages, they lack to distinguish the various connective tissue components. This review aims to highlight the special stains used to describe the connective tissue elements which contribute in diagnosing the tumors of connective tissue origin.
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Stains employed in the detection of microorganisms p. 10
E Abigail Viola, B Hindia
DOI:10.4103/ijofb.ijofb_5_22  
A clear diagnosis of infection can often be made based on the macroscopic appearance of tissue. Infection can be detected by frank pus, abscess formation, cavitation, hyperkeratosis, demyelination, pseudo-membrane formation, focal necrosis, and granulomas. Even if the precise nature of the suspect organism is never identified, some of these appearances may be sufficient to provide an initial, or at least provisional, diagnosis and allow treatment to begin, even if the precise nature of the suspect organism is never identified. It is important to remember that a well-executed hematoxylin and eosin method will stain a wide range of organisms. Romanowsky stains, such as Giemsa and Papanicolaou stains will also stain organisms and their cellular environment. Other infectious agents are difficult to detect using standard stains, necessitating the use of special techniques to demonstrate their presence. This review aims to highlight the commonly used stains for the detection of microorganisms in various histopathology and cytology material.
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Syndromes presenting in the oral and maxillofacial region: A review p. 15
B Hindia
DOI:10.4103/ijofb.ijofb_13_21  
Clinical examination is appropriate when a pertinent condition is ruled out considering all the associated syndromes. It is mandatory for a clinician to have sufficient knowledge about the syndromes for giving the final diagnosis and treatment plan. The aim of this review is to describe various syndromes presenting in the oral cavity.
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CASE REPORT Top

A rare and unusual variant of ameloblastoma p. 22
E Abigail Viola, B Hindia
DOI:10.4103/ijofb.ijofb_2_22  
Keratoameloblastoma (KA) is a rare histological variant of ameloblastoma usually characterized by extensive production of keratin within the odontogenic epithelium. Pindborg and Weinmann, in 1958, just introduced the term KA. Later in 1992, the WHO categorized it as acanthomatous ameloblastoma with the presence of areas of keratinization. Only a handful number of cases are documented, and it has to be differentiated from other keratin-producing tumors for rendering appropriate treatment. This review aims to discuss a case report of KA which presented as a challenge to the clinicians.
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